Seeing Women in the Scriptures

Photo Credit: http://mrg.bz/ni3LFz
Photo Credit: http://mrg.bz/ni3LFz

“In the Scriptures, it is often the women who are the first to see.”

She says this as a side note in our conversation, and it is a thought that won’t let me go. It is a piece of wisdom a rabbi has passed along to her, and she is now passing along to me.

Without even doing research, I can think of so many stories in which this is the case. It is the women who are first to see the risen Christ. It is the midwives, mother, and sister of Moses who are first to see that God is on the move to rescue his people. It is Rahab who is first to see the identity of God’s people. It is Mary who is first to see that a Messiah is coming. It is Ruth who is first to see her right to be received into Israel. It is Timothy’s mother and grandmother who are first to see his potential for leadership.

Even in times of failure, the women are still seeing. Eve sees the serpent and the pleasing nature of the fruit. Yet it is not the seeing but the action she takes as a result of it that sets forth the chain reaction of sin. Rebekah sees that Jacob is the one who should receive the blessing. Once again, it is not the seeing but the action she takes as a result of it that causes the turmoil.

“In the Scriptures, it is often the women who are the first to see.”

We hear a lot of messages about what it means to be a woman. We are told to be beautiful, successful, compassionate, supportive, feminine, and more. 

I have never been told to be a seer.

Mother Teresa was first to see the value of living with the lowest of the low in society. Rosa Parks was first to see that she didn’t have to switch seats on the bus just because someone told her she should. Brené Brown was first to see how it is embracing our vulnerability that allows us to embrace our humanity.

It has been a countless number of mothers, grandmothers, teachers, bosses, and friends, women whose names we may not even remember, who have been the first to see the potential in us and cheer us into our full identities.

“In the Scriptures, it is often the women who are the first to see.”

What if this is part of what God has created beautiful and unique about women: an ability to see things first?  What would it look like if more of us embraced that gift? How might the world be different?

“In the Scriptures, it is often the women who are the first to see.”

She says this as a side note in our conversation, and it is a thought that won’t let me go.